RRML - Gastric cancer is associated with a high rate of microsatellite instability versus chronic gastritis: A retrospective study
AMLR

ISSN online: 2284-5623

ISSN-L: 1841-6624

Rejection rate (2020): 75%

Română English


Journal Metrics

Impact Factor 0.5
Five Year Impact Factor 0.5
JCI 0.12


Advanced search


Top 10 downloaded articles
- July 2024 -
 
A comprehensive review of Prof... 8
Romanian Review of Laboratory ... 5
The usefulness of IS6110 neste... 3
α-HPV positivity analysis in ... 3
Phenotypic and genotypic study... 3
Prediction of acute pancreatit... 3
Monocyte to high-density lipop... 3
The role of nitro oxidative fa... 3
Diagnostic value of stress myo... 3
Assessment of ocrelizumab impa... 3

Log in

Concept, Design & Programming
Dr. Adrian Man

   
 
Nr. 28(1)/2020 DOI:10.2478/rrlm-2020-0006
XML
TXT

Research article

Gastric cancer is associated with a high rate of microsatellite instability versus chronic gastritis: A retrospective study

Li Xing, Hua Guo, Dongjie Zheng, Jin Liu, Baojun Zhou, Yanping Li, Ning Wang, Pu Zhao, Yan Liang, Wenxin Wu, Guixin Li

Correspondence should be addressed to: Guixin Li

Abstract:

Objective: Microsatellite instability (MSI) in gastric cancer contributes to genetic complexities of gastric cancer. In the current study, we employed a panel of mononucleotide and dinucleotide markers to detect MSI in 99 gastric cancer patients and 91 chronic gastritis patients and further analyzed the association of MSI with clinicopathologic variables of the study patients. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathologic data of primary gastric cancer patients and chronic gastritis patients. MSI was analyzed using five microsatellite markers, including D2S12, D5S346, D17S799, BAT26, and D18S34. MSI was defined as either a band shift or the appearance of a novel band in DNA. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to predict risk of MSI. Results: Seventeen (17.2%) gastric cancer patients and 7 (7.7%) chronic gastritis patients were positive for MSI (P=0.012). Multivariate analysis further showed that gastric cancer was associated with a significantly higher likelihood for MSI versus gastritis (OR 3.73; 95% CI 1.19, 11.72; P=0.024) while age, drinking or smoking was not associated with increased MSI. Conclusion: Gastric cancer is associated with a high rate of MSI. MSI should be further explored in future studies with a larger sample size for its role in gastric cancer development and as a predictive biomarker.

Keywords: microsatellite instability (MSI); gastric cancer; gastritis; predictive biomarker; clinicopathologic variables

Received: 22.4.2019
Accepted: 13.12.2019
Published: 8.1.2020

 
  PDF Download full text PDF
(395 KB)
     
 
How to cite
Xing L, Guo H, Zheng D, Liu J, Zhou B, Li Y, et al. Gastric cancer is associated with a high rate of microsatellite instability versus chronic gastritis: A retrospective study. Rev Romana Med Lab. 2020;28(1):57-65. DOI:10.2478/rrlm-2020-0006